Skin cancer may reduce risk of Alzheimer’s

Connection between nonmelanoma forms of skin cancer and a decreased risk of developing Alzheimer’s

Nobody wants skin cancer, but there may be a strange connection between nonmelanoma forms of skin cancer and a decreased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

A small study in New York found that people who developed nonmelanoma skin cancers were 80 percent less likely to get Alzheimer’s disease. The protective benefit was not seen with other forms of dementia.

The big question is why people who get these kinds of skin cancer are less likely to get Alzheimer’s. Study author Dr. Richard Lipton, a professor of neurology, epidemiology and population health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York said, “When cell division gets out of control, we call that cancer. And when specific populations of brain cells die, we call that Alzheimer’s. So, there is a balance between cell division [growth] and cell death. If you have an individual with an increased risk of cell division over cell death, that may be linked to a decreased risk of Alzheimer’s.”

Obviously more study needs to be done, but finding those answers could one day lead to a way to stop the progress of cell death that leads to Alzheimer’s.

For more, go to: WebMD – Some Skin Cancers Tied to Lower Odds of Alzheimer’s


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