Remicade Infusion Therapy | Norton Healthcare Louisville, Ky.

Remicade Infusion Therapy

Remicade infusion therapy is used to treat Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis and rheumatoid arthritis. Remicade (infliximab) helps decrease inflammation associated with inflammatory bowel disease and rheumatoid arthritis. For Crohn’s disease, Remicade can help decrease symptoms and achieve remission in patients who have not had success with other medical therapies.

Remicade is injected into a vein, called infusion. When patients begin receiving Remicade, they usually are prescribed treatments at two weeks and six weeks after the first infusion, then typically every eight weeks after that. Each infusion takes about three to four hours. Infusions can be done on an outpatient basis at a Norton Infusion Center

Remicade Infusion Side Effects

Remicade is a very potent drug that has potential side effects. These can occur during or after the infusion. Severe infections, including tuberculosis, pneumonia and sepsis, have been reported in patients taking Remicade. Tell your doctor if you have had or have been exposed to tuberculosis. Testing for tuberculosis generally is done before starting treatment with Remicade.

Patients with heart failure generally should not be treated with Remicade. Tell your physician if you have shortness of breath or new swelling of your ankles or feet. Rare reports of liver injury, blood disorders, lymphoma and other cancers, as well as neurologic disease, have occurred in patients receiving Remicade.

Allergic reactions to the protein in Remicade also can occur. Read important safety information at remicade.com.

Acute Reactions (Less Than 24 Hours After Infusion)

Reactions can occur during the Remicade infusion. Symptoms include fever, chest pain, heart palpitations, sweating, nausea, flushing, itching, changes in blood pressure and difficulty breathing.

These reactions usually go away by slowing the rate of infusion or taking acetaminophen, antihistamines, steroids and/or epinephrine. Your physician may recommend specific medications prior to your next infusion to decrease the chance of having another reaction.

Delayed Reactions (24 Hours to 14 Days After Infusion)

Reactions can occur after the Remicade infusion. Symptoms generally include muscle or joint aches, itching, rash, fever and fatigue.

These symptoms can be relieved by taking acetaminophen, antihistamines and/or steroids. If you experience these symptoms after your infusion, your physician may recommend specific medications prior to your next infusion to decrease the chance of having a delayed reaction.

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