Race training: What you need to know about running injuries

If you feel you can really push it, do it. If you need a break, take it. If you’re not sure you can meet your training plan’s recommended distance on the training guide, start off with a brisk walk and ease into your run.

Whether your training for your first 5k, 10k, half marathon or marathon, or you’re a seasoned runner, you should be listening to your body. How are you feeling?

If you feel you can really push it, do it. If you need a break, take it. If you’re not sure you can meet your training plan’s recommended distance on the training guide, start off with a brisk walk and ease into your run.

Join the Couch to Race training program

Connect with other participants and get support from athletic and sports health professionals.

Join Couch to 5k
Join Couch to 10k

Overtraining can increase injury. By overusing the same muscles and putting constant pressure on your knees and ankles, you are increasing your chance of shin splints and muscle soreness. Be smart and listen to your body. After all, you won’t meet your goal if you are sidelined by an injury.

Feeling more than a little soreness? Don’t let an injury stop you from reaching your goal. If you are a new runner or training for a long distance race for the first time, you are a higher risk of injury.

Signs of a running injury:

  • Pain or discomfort while running
  • Pain at rest
  • Pain that keeps you awake at night
  • Limping
  • Shortness of breath after little exertion (exercise asthma)
  • Stiffness
  • Headaches during or after running
  • Dizziness or lightheaded feeling any time

Your training guide provides a list of common running injuries and treatment options if you are experiencing any of the signs of injury listed above.


Appointments

(502) 629-1234

Search our entire site.

Schedule an Appointment

Select an appointment date and time from available spots listed below.