Spine Surgery Questions and Answers | Norton Healthcare Louisville, Ky.

Spine Surgery Questions and Answers

How Long Will It Take to Recover From Spine Surgery?

The biggest variables affecting recovery time are the nature of your surgery and your condition before surgery. Here are some general guidelines on what to expect.

Discectomy: Recovery is typically fairly quick. Some pain, numbness or weakness in the nerve that was compressed is normal and should clear up in a few weeks.

Laminectomy or fusion surgery: You should expect a longer recovery time and delays returning to normal activities. Bones take at least three to four months after surgery to heal.

How Soon After Spine Surgery Can I Drive?

Driving will depend on your surgery and your postoperative medication. Generally, you should assume you won’t be driving for at least two weeks after surgery. Once your surgeon clears you to drive, you will ease into it with short trips.

Keep your trips as a passenger short. If you have a long ride home after you are discharged, plan on stopping every half-hour or so to stretch.

How Should I Prepare My Home for After Spine Surgery?

  • Seek out a family member or friend who could assist you when you get home. Make arrangements for someone to be available to assist you after surgery and during the first few days of recovery.
  • A “grabber” so you can pick up items off the floor without bending over will come in handy. These are usually a few feet long and allow you to grasp socks, pens and other items that may fall on the floor.
  • Prepared meals and healthy snacks will save time and energy.
  • Remove floor mats, clutter and other items that could pose a tripping hazard.
  • Slip-on shoes will keep you from having to bend over to tie laces.
  • Make sure necessities are within easy reach. Waist level is best.
  • Make arrangements for child care and pet care.
  • Put night lights in the bathrooms and hallways.
  • Stop smoking. Smoking can inhibit the healing process and lead to more issues with your surgery.

Is Spine Surgery Risky?

Complications from spinal surgery are rare, but you should be aware of some risks:

  • Some pain after surgery should be expected, but sometimes surgery doesn’t relieve all of your preoperative pain and, in rare cases, can make it worse. Discuss your expectations for pain relief candidly with your surgeon.
  • After a spinal fusion, neighboring parts of the spine can take on more stress. Over time, this can lead to pain in the damaged part of the spine. This transitional syndrome can happen between a healthy area of the spine and the area that has been fused.
  • In a spinal fusion, the fused vertebrae may not heal together properly. The result is usually continued pain and a condition called pseudoarthrosis. Follow-up surgery may be required.

Will I Still Have Pain After Spine Surgery?

  • We will try to control your pain but will not be able to take all the pain away.
  • We will give you pain medicine safely, following your surgeon’s orders.
  • You will get pain medicine immediately after surgery. Pain pills and muscle relaxers will be started as soon as you can have food. Your nurse probably will tell you to ask for medication when you need it.
  • Even if you still have pain, you need to get out of bed and move as soon as your surgeon says it is OK to do so. Moving and walking may help to decrease your pain.

How Long Does It Take to Walk After Spine Surgery?

  • You will be helped to sit on the side of your bed on the day or night of surgery. You may be helped to get out of bed and walk.
  • The day of surgery, you will get out of bed and walk with the physical therapist or nurse at least three times a day. You will sit up for meals.
  • The more you get out of bed and walk, the faster you will recover.
  • Ask for help before getting out of bed. Call, don’t fall!

What Equipment Will I Have As I Recover From Spine Surgery?

  • IV: You will have an IV until your surgeon gives permission for it to be removed. You will get fluids through your IV during and after surgery.
  • Incentive spirometer: Your nurse or respiratory therapist will show you how to do deep-breathing exercises with an incentive spirometer (breathing tool) every hour while you are awake.
  • Urinary catheter: If you have a catheter (tube to drain your urine), it will be removed the day after surgery.
  • Drain: If you have a drain from your surgical incision (cut), it will be removed before you go home.
  • Leg/foot pumps: These are wraps that go around your legs or feet to help circulate your blood through your legs and feet. These should be on whenever you are in bed.
  • Brace: Your surgeon may want you to wear a back or neck brace after surgery. Follow your surgeon’s instructions about when and how to wear the brace. .

Will I Need Someone to Help Me at Home When I Leave The Hospital?

  • You will need someone to help you at home and someone to drive you to your appointments until your surgeon says it is OK for you to drive.
  • A care management nurse will come to your hospital room after surgery and talk to you about your care after you leave the hospital.
  • The physical therapist will determine the level of care you will require after discharge. With insurance approval, options include going home with a home health agency or a skilled nursing facility. A skilled nursing facility will do inpatient physical therapy and the staff can help take care of you.

Making It Easy to Get Back to Your Life

  • With six Norton Leatherman Spine locations in Louisville and Southern Indiana, we have specialists near you.
  • We use minimally invasive procedures that can reduce recovery time and the risk of complications.
  • Sophisticated pain management aims to keep you comfortable and safe.
  • Communicate with your provider, manage appointments, refill prescriptions and more anytime from a computer or mobile device with a free MyNortonChart account.

About Norton Leatherman Spine

Norton Leatherman Spine in Louisville and Southern Indiana offers world-class care from surgeons who are recognized nationally and internationally for their innovation, expertise and skill. Norton Leatherman Spine is one of the premier research and education programs in the United States for spinal surgeons.

Our rich history traces back to Kenton D. Leatherman, M.D., who more than 50 years ago became the first orthopedic surgeon in Kentucky to specialize in spine care. A University of Louisville School of Medicine graduate, he developed leading-edge approaches to treating scoliosis after World War II.

  • The board-certified and fellowship-trained specialists at Norton Leatherman Spine are among the most experienced in the country, treating conditions like yours for an average of 20 years.
  • We have orthopedic spine surgeons providing care from our offices in downtown and suburban Louisville and in surrounding counties.
  • Our physicians pinpoint your diagnosis to come up with the right treatment plan, including surgical and nonsurgical options as appropriate.
  • We offer minimally invasive and robotic-assisted procedures that carry less risk and can speed your recovery. Norton Leatherman Spine surgeons are actively involved in the development of next-generation minimally invasive technologies.
  • The physicians at Norton Leatherman Spine are leaders in their field and train the next generation of specialists. More than 100 of the leading spine surgeons practicing throughout the U.S. today were trained at Norton Leatherman Spine.
  • Techniques developed at Norton Leatherman Spine have produced better outcomes for patients, with fewer side effects, and are routinely performed around the world today.
  • Our team performs more than 4,000 surgeries a year, and patients come to our providers more than 30,000 times a year.
Leatherman – 7525

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